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to provide a voice of the world. last week's european council agreed the overall limit on eu spending for the next seven years, starting in 2014. been agreed in the past, spending has gone up, but last week we agreed that spending should come down. by working with like-minded allies, we delivered a real- terms cut in what brussels can spend for the first time in history. as the house knows, the eu budget is negotiated annually, so what we were negotiating -- initially at the council last november and again last week -- was not the individual annual budgets, but rather the overall framework for the next seven years. this includes the overall ceilings on what can be spent -- effectively, the limit on the european union's credit card for the next seven years. during the last negotiation, which covered the period 2007 to 2013, the last government agreed to an 8% increase in the payments ceiling, to 943 billion. put simply, this gave the eu a credit card with a higher limit, and today we are still living with the results of allowing the eu's big spenders to push for more and more spending
a goal for the european union. after years of very little progress, the e appears to -- the eu appears to have an ally in what has. >> president obama announced the start of trade negotiations on a trade deal. brussels said talks could begin before summer. if successful, those negotiations would result in the biggest financial trade deal ever. >> the eu and u.s. already trade some 2 billion euros worth of goods and services every day. about 1/3 of total global commerce. president obama wants to bring that commerce into what would be the world's biggest free trade zone. the european commission says that would have world wide applications. >> which translates into tens of billions of euros every year and tens of thousands of new jobs. this offers us a great perspective at a time when we are gradually making our way to recovery. most important of all, it is a boost to our economies that does not cost 1 cent of taxpayer money. >> both sides stand to benefit. economists to warn that negotiations will be tough. the eu and washington disagree on issues ranging from industrial trade barriers a
, here our president is addressing concerns in their lives. i agree the big topics like the eu trade pac that is very important. but i don't think people in the country are listening for that. they are listening for all the little programs that the rest of you ridicule, and he is telegraphing he gets what their problems are and he is on their side. that is very important politically. >> i will help redeem the president all right? he is on the wake of three weeks away from his earlier address at the inauguration okay? people saw that. and i think they feel he is going to be repeating that. and that is probably a big reason why they didn't tune in. therefore, he gets a pass. what do you think? >> also i think that's right. i think eleanor's right if you are watching it on white house.gov my wife watched it on her ipad. that doesn't show up in the neilsen ratings. a lot of people were watching it online or watching it the next day. tv consumption is changing. >> the oratory about they deserve a vote and going through all the gun victims, those are real people and they were sitting there. >>
year. >>> and the eu moves to clamp down on big paychecks in the banking sector, looking to cap bonuses on a banker's salary as early as next year. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >> okay. we're back. you're mobiled up and we have some data. >> yes. it's such a mobile world, isn't it, in many ways. let's first talk about what's happening with the german unemployment figures. we were waiting on these. it turns out 6.9%, that is the unemployment level for germany in january. the unadjusted figure is 7.4%. it's higher than expected. you can see the forecast was for 6.8%. the prior month was revised higher. the rate itself was unchanged. that's a right i think here in london or certainly in the u.s. they wouldn't mind seeing at this point. >> we've created a million private sector jobs. >> in britain? >> yeah. >> well, congratulations. >> there you go. that is the great conundrum, right? >> it's true. the different between -- well, and even with germany. the liesh market social security holding up, despite the sharp contr
today also included plans for a free-trade agreement between the eu and the u.s. kerry also took time out of his schedule to meet with young people in the german capital. >> security lock down as john kerry returned to the city he once called home. the first stop on the visit was for a chat with young berliners. discussions of a different kind with the chancellor. high on their agenda -- foreign policy and the economy, but first these comments on the relationship with the u.s. >> i record a great deal of importance to transatlantic ties. we do not just have common values. we also face common tasks. >> a number of these challenges were discussed at an earlier meeting with kerry's german counterpart. first and foremost, the plans for a new free trade deal between the u.s. and europe. >> germany is our largest trade partner in europe, and we want to see even more trade and investment that will create jobs -- jobs for -- jobs for germans, for americans, for all europeans. >> negotiations are set to begin within months, and i of the two sides managed to overcome their differences, could be
a warhead small enough to fit on a long range missile. the eu secured council called an emergency meeting. chery joins us now from seoul. can you tell us first of all what the general reaction has been there and a lot bit about the impact of the economy. we're watching, for example, the south korea and won take a hit this morning. >> well within not much of a reaction on the kospi. it did end down just about 0.26% here. but i wouldn't say it's a big tumble and it is korean won gained. i think by now investors have learned that north korea related tensions and developments, geopolitical issues like this have had impact on the korean market. so that explains the absence of such strong reaction on the stock market. but the latest that we have on this development is that we have china's reaction to north korea's nuclear tests, as well. china's foreign ministry statement goes that it is china's firm stance to realize nonnuclearization for the korean peninsula and prevent a nuclear proliferation and maintain peace and stability in northeast asia. remember, china is north korea's probably one an
with the european union. cyprus asked the eu and others for a bailout package last june, but have yet to reach a deal. >>> and now to the latest on the academy awards held sunday night in los angeles. this 85th edition saw the triumph of "argo" directed by ben affleck. it won in the best picture and two other categories. "argo" competed against several high-profile features including steve spielberg's "lincoln" and "zero dark 30." ben affleck's film received two more oscars in the film editing and adapted screenplay categories. ang lee snatched best director for "life of pi". it received the largest number of awards. there were a total of four oscars. daniel day-lewis' portrayal of abraham lincoln earned him the best actor award. he was the first man to be awarded three oscars in this category. media in iran have criticized "argo" for being what they call a highly fictitious account of the crisis and portraying iranians as evil. our correspondent in tehran says iranian producers are working on their own version of the story. >>> japan's prime minister named his choice for the next bank of japa
uranium to 20%. beyond that point they can move toward uranium that's weapons grade. the u.s. and the eu have imposed sanctions to encourage them to abandon their nuclear ambitions. iranian leaders show little sign of slowing down their nuclear program. last week they announced the construction of new nuclear plans. >>> new u.s. secretary of state john kerry has sent a clear message to iran's leaders. he said their degrlegates must ready to compromise. he was in london on his first trip abroad. he met with british prime minister. kerry and hague said they agree that stopping the program is a priority. >> as we've repeatedly made clear the window for a diplomatic solution simply cannot by definition remain open forever. >> kerry also made a direct plea to syria's opposition leaders. last friday they said they will stay away from the meeting. the international community is not doing enough to challenge the assad regime. >>> israeli leaders are taking their own steps to make sure they are safe from a nuclear iran. they unveiled arrow 3 missile. it can shot down missiles in outer space. th t
and the announcement -- trying to do u.s./eu free trade agreement. i think that's really good news, coupled with what we're maybe trying to do in asia. that's at least a little bit of pro-growth common ground that both parties can try to tackle together. >> gentlemen, great to have you on the program. thanks so much. we will be watching many of these ideas manifest in the coming years. see you soon. tony t fratto, michael beschloss joining us. >>> up next "on the money," over came china's cultural revolution to become a star of america's >>> our entrepreneurs born or made? my next guest tells a remarkable story of innovation. she remade her own life, surviving a difficult youth in mao's china and american technology pioneer. king few is author of the memoir "bend not break." ping, great to have you on the program. thanks for joining us. >> so pleased to be here, maria. >> the memoir is actually a page turner. we were so looking forward to ha having you. it's been quite a journey. beginning with being sent to a labor camp at age 8 where you cared for your younger sister and suffered significant abuse.
registrations across the eu slumped to an all-time low in january. >>> government delays its decision on the next bank of japan governor. is this the beginning of a more moderate japanese agenda? >>> and we're live in milan as the italian electoral race enters the final stref. we'll hear just why the mayor will decide to vote. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >> all right. welcome to today's, a bit of a transport theme going on this morning. >> or lack thereof. >> well, there's bmw, has their recalled. you have to take your one and three series back. >> the thing about the bmw is people have to take them to the special bmw shop, anyway. when you have a recall like this, it's a pretty straightforward process for owners. >> then making a replica of the "titanic." some people are worried they're making it in a chinese shipyard. >> they're pitching this with "titanic" with a twist. some say the twist should be maybe this time it won't sink. >> they are going to do the original sailing route. what happens when they get th
historic when we accomplish it. that is to start the work on a u.s. e.u. trans-atlantic trade that investment or airship to grow prosperity on both sides of the atlantic. it is no secret that we both faced economic challenges. we all do in this new marketplace, and a global challenge the marketplace. the fact is that europe freestanding aloud is the largest economy in the world and when you join that together with the united states of america, we have a powerful ability to be able to affect the rules of the road and to be able to raise standards and most importantly create jobs for all of our people. europe is already america's largest trading partner. a disagreement will create more jobs for additional investment and nasty note earlier this month, president obama made it clear this is a top priority for the united states. we also discussed the responsibility that we share to support fragile democracies across the world, across the monograph from libya to tunisia and beyond. i say to our friends here in the united kingdom, it is in our mutual interest to see that these fledgli
barnes, thank so much. >>> the eu leaders have agreed to a drastically reduced budget. the seven-year deal for 1.28 trillion dollars is the first spending cut in the union's 27-year history. it must still be approved by the eu parliament and lawmakers are already suggesting massive cuts are not acceptable. police in three western states and mexico are still searching for a former lapd officer who was accused of killing three people and threatening dozens more. let's get an update tonight from lapd headquarters and correspondent alicia acuna. >> reporter: because of the heavy snow in the mountains, the air search with the heat seeking equipment they've been using has been grounded. however, officials do say snow on the ground does help them track folks. >> our folks are highly trained. that's what h we train for. >> reporter: the manhunt for christopher dorner carries on despite the snow. >> we're going to continue searching until either we discover that he left the mountain or we find him, one of the two. >> reporter: the last signs of the fired lapd officer were the tracks leadi
. gerri: they tested the program to see who was eligible they expected 15% it was 41 percent the e.u. -- either did not return communication or did not meet requirements. astonishing. amazing. food stamp spending is that the record high and i that tonight we will hear more ideas for spending taxpayer dollars. >> it wasn't even designed to cover 15 percent they have a continuous problem finding government problems like this. gerri: i agree. thank you for your time. what do you think? should we hang up on the free phone program? log on to gerriwillis.com i will share the results. the lunchbox cops are back. but some schools are not following the rules. and the report shows solar panels to as much harm to the environment as good. ♪ this they didn't take a dime. how much in feesoes your bank take to watch your money? if your bank takes more money than a stranger, you need an ally. ally bank. your money needs an ally. you know it even after all these years. but your erectile dysfunction - you know,that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready
to and hopefully they will now is on trade and the announcement -- trying to do u.s./eu free trade agreement. i think that's really good news, coupled with what we're maybe trying to do in asia. that's at least a little bit of pro-growth common ground that both parties can try to tackle together. >> gentlemen, great to have you on the program. thanks so much. we will be watching many of these ideas manifest in the coming years. see you soon. >> thanks. >> tony fratto, michael beschloss joining us. >>> up next "on the money," the entrepreneur who became china's consult cultural revolution to become a star of america's capitalism. ping fu will join me. >> this is a 3d printed shoe. [ indistinct conversations ] [ male announcer ] when you wear dentures you may not know it, but your mouth is under attack. food particles infiltrate and bacteria proliferate. ♪ protect your mouth, with fixodent. the adhesive helps create a food seal defense for a clean mouth and kills bacteria for fresh breath. ♪ fixodent, and forget it. >>> are entrepreneurs born or made? my next guest tells a remarkable story of
. we have the eu rising starts, the outstanding british film. but in the major categories, clearly people do look to the bafta the way same they would look to the gloelden gloep globes to see how things were going. "argo" is seen by everybody as a pack leader. there is a strange absence there on best director. whoever wins best director will be remembered as having won in the year that the most significant contender wasn't nominated. >> why isn't he nominated? >> who knows. who knows. i think we got it right, but who knows why he wasn't. one reason is because what they've done with the oscars now is increased the best film from five up to ten. now you have i think it's nine nominations this year. of course you're going to get a mismatch because there aren't the same number of films that there were directed. >> mark, good to see you. thanks so much, indeed. >> thanks for coming by. >> always a very good turn out, as well. >> i still think silver linings with a different name would have done so well. >>> anyway, the clearing up is occurring after nemo. what impact will this have on r
against the e.u. imposed austerity and they did it in two forms. they voted down dramatically mario monthty who was the symbol of that as you -- austerity and the e.u. driven reform process. secondly they have voted with incredible, incredible strength and voice the movement of, five-star movement, untie establishment, untie austerity movement that tries to fight the old establishment in italy. ashley: now we have best sawn any from the center-left party who tries to form a coalition government which of seems next to impossible. so does that raise the specter of another election and how soon would that be? >> that is my opinion. my call is that here, the question is not if, the question is when italy will have early elections and i believe because of some institutional delays, as well as current situation, italy could go to new election between six and 12 months from now. i think earlier than six months it is very difficult because of the institutional situation. but bersani has a very difficult job. he already offered a hand to mr. grillo to form a coalition and mr. grillo turned h
the eu or china somehow swallowing up every bit of innovation that exists in the world. they're no longer, i think, worried about our -- our economy being overwhelmed beyond our shores. stuart: a little awkward on the timing there and finally, ben bernanke will give his update on the economy to congress today. is he going to keep printing money to make up for the dire spending cuts that could start friday or to protect the economy against europe? what's he going to do? is he going to keep printing money or not? we'll be here right at ten o'clock to find out exactly what he's going to do. it will affect the market. all right, next, we're following up on the big story, the big stock selloff and ask, why do the italians have such a big impact on our money and plus, the governor of kansas, we'll ask sam brownback his push to eliminate the income tax. and i've got good news on housing, too. ♪ [ cows moo ] [ sizzling ] more rain... [ thunder rumbles ] ♪ [ male announcer ] when the world moves... futures move first. learn futures from experienced pros with dedicated chats and daily live webi
that perhaps is even more fundamentally dangerous for britain and much of the rest of europe than taming the e.u.'s superstate tendencies. this is the problem of attitudes and how the institutional expression in the economy. because as i illustrate in "becoming europe" the prevailing conviction across most of europe is that the state is the primary way in which we address common problems and meet our responsibilities and obligations to our fellow citizens. that such obligations might be realized outside the realm of politics doesn't apparently occurred to large numbers of european political leaders including i have to say a considerable number of the center-right european politicians. so in this regard i have often wondered what -- would think if he read a particularly important book that was written 180 years ago by one of his compatriots. because although it's about the new world, democracy in america was sent written for an american audience. alexis de tocqueville's intended audience was europe. so i think you would be astonished to learn how the americans observed by de tocqueville dealt with p
, if the u.n. comes in line of the eu position of the help to rebels but he would not divulge. it's a busy, busy week in rome, tamron. >> thank you. greatly appreciate. >>> and several fans and stars have come to the defense of child actress quvenzhane wallis after she was brutally insulted by the website the onion. the site since deleted the offensive tweet. now apologizing. we'll tell you what the onion posted. toure will join us. ♪ alright, let's go. ♪ shimmy, shimmy chocolate. ♪ shimmy, shimmy chocolate. ♪ we, we chocolate cross over. ♪ yeah, we chocolate cross over. ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing fiber one 80 calorie chocolate cereal. ♪ chocolate. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. and they have six grams of sugars. with fifteen grams of protein to help manage hunger... look who's getting smart about her weight. [ male announcer
to review by scientists at regulatory agencies. the 2008 e.u. risk assessment for pdcpp using all the best information available concludes that tdcpp gives no reason for concern to human health in relation to the physics chemical properties. couch manufacturers are mandated by law to use it in the foam stuffing. it's a little known law in california known as technical bulletin 17 which says the couch must be able to withstand exposure to a small flame for 12 seconds without igniting. while the regulation applies only to california, manufacturers use it in all the products instead of creating special furniture for the west coast. >> that is what is left after a couple minutes of burning. >> i believe fire retardant is good but they should use other chemicals or safe chemicals that doesn't affect the breathing of other people involved in it. they should find other methods to make the fire retardant safer. >> reporter: there are no warning labels so you don't know what chemicals are inside your couch. >> even if i wanted to make a choice about it, i wouldn't have been able to plaque a choice.
are subject to review by scientists at regulatory agencies. the 2008 eu risk assessment for this chemical which is using all the best information available concludes that tdcpp gives no reason for concern to human health. n relation to its physic chemical -- health in relation to its physic chemical properties. couch manufacturers are mandated by law to use the flame retardants in the tomorrow stuffing. it's a little known law in southern california known as technical bulletin 117 which says the couch must be able to stand exposure to a small flame for 12 seconds without igniting. while the regulation applies only to california, manufacturers use it in all their products instead of jreat the west coast. >> that's what's left of a couch after a couple minutes of burning. >> it's a huge concern for firefighters according to dave cope, fire marshal for the city of laurel. >> i believe fire retardant is good. i just believe they should use safe chemicals that doesn't affect the breathing of anybody that's involved in before or after or during a fire that, they should find other methods to mak
.s. democratic process, take a look at italy. its election debacle threatens to unleash the e.u. debt crisis once again. should the u.s. brace for impact? we'll explain it. do you ever have too much money? ♪ ♪ . melissa: this is a big topic this week whether companies should allow employees to work from home. obviously yahoo!'s marisa meyer started the dialogue with her bombshell announcement starting in june all employees will be expected to show up at the office or else find work somewhere else. this is controversial move generating heat what is best for the company's bottom line. is working from home progress or is it unproductive? joining me now with both side, are hadley heath from the independent women's forum and republican strategist know well knicks pour. -- noell nikpour. welcome to the show. this is interesting test case for the rest of the economy. this is standing up saying listen, this is okay, if you're not here, i don't know what you're doing. i don't know you're not doing. you're n not talking to people in the hallways. there are actual meetings and something beneficial from
partnership on trade. she'd he wanted to open a new negotiation, a transatlantic partnership with the e.u. is it your feeling that people are going to look at that and say, okay, at least there's a little part of the business agenda he's pursuing by trying to get down trade barriers? >> one of the criticisms is there had been no new free trade initiatives in his first administration. you know, they acted on some that were previously proposed. yeah, obviously that would be something that -- that businesses would -- certainly want to sell to the world, this for sure. that -- >> larry kudlow was on with us last night and said we don't need a new agreement with the e.u. we've already got agreements with most of the countries involved. so we'll see how much value the marketplace puts on that. >> okay. all right. john harwood. becky's got the next story coming up. just -- a classic. it's -- you know, i got to talk to but this. i really -- let's lets beck dee it. do you have a new view on cayman islands? i know bachus says that mr. lew paid his taxes that he was supposed to pay. this was fully w
in western and north western africa. they are considered or seen by the e.u., france, as the least problematic state of the sierra. the number of youth recruited into al-qaeda so far remains very small, and they attack on soil, lack sophistication. capabilities are extremely limited, and it's affiliated networks are disorganized and weak today. the government's aggressive pursuit and imprisonment pursuit of violence extremists temporarily disrupted the growth, but like other countries, niger, are faced with the challenge of ensuring control over the borders. i mean, mori tan ya shares a long border with mali, 2240 kilometers. it's even more than algeria which it shares 1300 kilometers a border with mali. border management plays a key role in counter in all forms of smuggling and, also, as i said the fighters in northern mali, so they have adopted an aggressive approach to fight violent extremists, more than the neighbors, definitely more than mali. for example, they equipped its airport, three airports with i.t. systems. it has full passport readers, it has built 27 # -- 27 posts t
as a terrorist organization. the second thing, in 2006 you were one of 12 senators who refused to position the e.u. to identify hezbollah as a terrorist group. third, in november of twee, you failed to -- 2003, you failed to vote on a syrian accountability act with sanctions -- occupation of lebanon. four, in 2001, you were one of only two senators that year to vote against renewal of the iran-libya sanctions act. and lastly, in 2001, you were one of four senators who refused to sign the letter supporting israel. are those accurate? >> well, let's start with the -- >> no. i just want to know if the statement -- these are votes that took place. do you agree those votes took place? >> i want to ask the letter that you just noted in your fifth point, what was the date in the letter? >> the date. >> you said i refused to sign letter. >> october of 2001. >> a letter to -- >> ok. skip that one. is the other ones true? >> well, it was fairly important -- >> it's very important. i was holding the letter at the time that we were gathering signatures. >> i see. on the 2008 question regarding designating the
the rights in the eu for compensation. so if you can't fly through a volcanic ash situation, they have to delay, you're going to have to pay somebody. those kind of rules are frankly stupid, and airlines are just going to have to raise their fares to cover the. >> jenna: the europe courts think this is a fair way to go. do you think it will come to the u.s. courts and carriers as well? >> reporter: oh, there are consumer twits out there all over the place that would love to see this happen. the fact of the matter is the unintended consequence of this would be outrageous. the three hour tarmac rule we have today, there weren't a lot of those, but it has increase airlines canceling flights when they think they might not get people off an airplane. if you really want more expensive tickets and want to have less air service, this is a great way to go. >> jenna: i might be a little bit, don't tell anybody, of a consumer twit when it comes to this because i do want some accountability when we fly. when you walk up to the desk and they say there's a delay, and you have no other options, you f
about, well, for the moment, the eu -- we have that kind of psychological factor. a healthy private sector. and the problem is what? the problem is government and bad policy. and that's what we have to offset. >> but jim iuorio, i want to know where to invest. do we buy gold, silver, and commodities? do we buy banks, which are lagging a little bit? do we buy industrial cyclicals to play the world boom, if there is such a thing? in other words, how do you invest right now, having passed this 14,000 benchmark? >> well, there's a couple things. first of all, when caterpillar released its earnings it talked about good numbers out of housing. and you stloe in china. you invest in things like copper. you know i still like gold and silver. and today with the green light from the fed i'm still going to stay in things like those. i am in bank of america. i am in health care. i think the stock market looks pretty good. you said before, though, the stock market tends to be a leading indicator of the economy. when the fed pumps in so much money and global banks pump in so much money, i think yo
nominee that refused to sign letters supporting israel and, refused to sign a letter asking the eu to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization and the list goes on and on and on but at the end of the day, this is the president's decision, i give him great discretion and can't believe one democratic colleague is not upset by this choice, enough to speak out. >> chris: now, one of the other things you want and you are using the nomination as leverage, is to get more information about benghazi, the president says that that is all about politics. take a look at this: >> president barack obama: we've had more testimony and more paper provided to congress than ever before, and, congress is sort of running out of things to ask. >> chris: question, tell me the single most important thing that after all of these months you still don't know about benghazi. >> pretty hard. let's start with after. we don't know who changed the talking points to take the references to al qaeda, or the talking points given to susan rice and don't know who the survivors of the attack are so congress can in
's some talks coming up now in kazakhstan of all places in late february involving the eu, the united states and the iranians. and so this is going to be a venue in which people are going to be able to see to a certain extent how serious iran is about negotiating on limits on its nuclear program. there hasn't been negotiations for some significant period of ti. and this is an opportunity to test the iranians. i think this initial round is not going to prove much but certainly over the next six months, i think there will be an ample opportunity to see if there is an intent on the iranian part to reach some sort of compromise. >> rose: leon panetta and others have said the following. we have no information that there's been a decision on the part of the iranian government and the most influential people there to builds a nuclear weapon and a missile that will deliver it. what do they mean when they say that? >> well, i can't really speak for them but i think it's pretty clear that iran has made the decision to have a nuclear weapons program. and there's really nothing el that explains
and afghanistan by introducing weapons systems and training. bulgaria is now going to the eu to try to get at least some tougher sanctions on hezbollah through iran because of their attempt -- they attempted to kill the saudi ambassador in washingt washington, d.c. >> if the president means what he has said repeatedly and clearly, nuclear iran means war with the united states. the president has said that he does not endorse containment of iran. they will not have, he said, nuclear weapons. if they cross that threshold, there must be some red line somewhere that means war with iran. >> i mean, there are other options to war. >> i think the worst possible scenario would be a nuclear-armed iran, i think that has to be stopped. by any and all measures. >> which the president has pledged to do. >> which he has. i think we need to work in consultation with our european allies to make sure that that doesn't happen. they have been bad players straight-on. they're not negotiating in my opinion in good faith. i think we have to understand that. >> the real question is, what to do? we can talk about
worried, i think about our economy being overwhelmed, either by europe at large, the eu or china somehow swallowing up here bit of innovation that exists in the world and they're no longer, i think, worried about our, our economy being overwelcomed beyond our shores. but, and i don't think there's no, there is he' very little doubt in any circles out there. about america's ability to be in a position to lead the world in the 21st century, not only in terms of our foreign policy, our incredible defense establishment, but economically. >> governor, fewer americans are working, the last quarter the economy just contracted and we've got 50 million americans on food stamps and 6 trillion in new debt. and what alternate university is crazy uncle joe living in here? >> let's just say i wouldn't characterize it the way he said it. the fact of the matter is that most american families have done worse in the obama, quote, recovery than they did during the the recession. and median family income went down $1500 during the the recession itself, and then went down another $2500 during the obama recov
, but not much more than that. the eu is providing non-legal aid, i am wondering if the u.s. is considering this? and if you are ceding influence for the ron. afghanistan has asked u.s. troops to leave the province and i think within two weeks, can we get your comment on that? >> with respect to afghanistan, i understand the concerns they have expressed. appropriately, when a complaint they may have thought to be appropriately evaluated. they will be, i assure you. i have taken appropriate note and i have had a great deal of involvement in afghanistan with president karzai. there are evaluations of how things might have gone wrong or might have changed. we are working on a bilateral security arrangement and this transition process. we have had a very good conversation with the president. president obama talked to him before making announcements. we have listened very carefully to his observations about wanting to speed up the transition with respect to management of security. i can assure you that we are finely attuned to the needs of the afghan people, and the most effective ways to make this t
cartney in 1995. it's also pleased to have the finest neoclassical building in the e.u., st. george's hall. st. george's was one of the earliest on the scene, and sadly fell into disrepair, but it reopened in april 2007, after a £23 million makeover, and through its refurbished doors pour today's visitors to the antiques roadshow, hoping to impress our experts with their own private treasures. so, how long has it taken you to bring this band together? it took me about 15 years in all. and why did you do it? well, i was fortunate enough to work for a man called tom roberts, who was my father's partner in business, and he was a real wise old sage, and knowledgeable, and he was, um, very much into collecting meissen china. one christmas, i went along to his house, and i saw his collection of monkeys, and i was fascinated by this. i was about 19 or 20. he said, "well, you might as well start your collection with that one." so he gave you this bagpiper? yes, he gave me that, and from time to time, he gave me ones which had duplicates. aha. now, by duplicates, actually, in this case, we've got "qua
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